Category: Product Reviews

Angela Graurholz and In Flagrante Two

 By John Veldhoen

The poet and occasional art critic Herbert Read, under the influence of the philosopher Max Stirner, wrote about the “idiotic prejudice” which wrongly considers photography as a purely objective means of reproduction, and always at the service of a “point of view”.  In essence, I agree, even if I might desire to redact the word “idiotic” in good faith (which is not to sound too pious, I am just as capable of saying “raca” (or idiot). I should point to myself and say oh vain man… I am ashamed to say that for me, at least, that takes work…)

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Beholder DS1 Gimbal – Revolutionary Electronic Stabilizers for Video

 By Jordan Drake

Even if you haven’t been staying on top of the latest tech for shooting video, it’s been hard to miss all the excitement over electronic gimbals like the DJI Ronin and Freefly MoVi. These revolutionary electronic stabilizers work like the image stabilizers in your camera or lens, but they’re large enough to stabilize for much larger movements like walking with the camera or controlling vibrations from a vehicle.

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Book Review: Multitude, Solitude

 By John Veldhoen

Looking at Dave Heath’s photographs in the biggest, and best monograph on his work, a conjunction appears with the title, combining to make what I’d call an ideological value, an “oneist interpretation” of the world and individual perception, perhaps like what Hinduism demarcates as Advaita.

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The Auteurist History of Film

 By John Veldhoen

I think of “An Auteurist History of Film” by Charles Silver as the ultimate primer for an initiate to auteurist filmmaking. Silver wrote “The intricacies of the auteur theory can be pretty convoluted and burdensome to anyone who just wants to see a good movie”, but at the same time I think he also knew that by allowing for the concept of the auteur, even by fostering it, a more elevated conversation about cinema could take place.

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Muhammad Ali: The Greatest of All Time

 By John Veldhoen

Throughout his public life there was a childlike playfulness in Ali that seemed to transcend the brutality of his sport. After his career he became in appearance a peaceable, kind, and gentle man. The spectacle of violence comes through in the oversized book “Goat”, but the more economical “The Greatest of All Time”, also from Taschen, will do more for anyone who wants to survey how in the twentieth century people made myths from pictures.

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Another Way of Telling and Art Photography

 By John Veldhoen

I waited for a re-print Another Way of Telling the last few months, and when it came in last week I bought it, and read it enthusiastically. Jean Mohr’s photography is great, especially the last section of the book, taken mostly of peasants in the Haute-Savoie region of Eastern France. The photos reminded me that the best of what occurs in art, and in life, is like what Guido de Bres wrote, “For it is before our eyes as a most beautiful Book”.

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The Painters and the Camera

 By John Veldhoen

There is a well-known story about the so-called “blue period” of paintings by Pablo Picasso. It goes that Picasso became friends with a Catalan youth that he met in Paris, named Carlos Casagemas, a thoroughly 19th century cliché bohemian obsessive type who ended up shooting himself over an unrequited love. The historian Anne Baldessari conjectured that a cyanotype in a Picasso trove is of Casagemas, and that Picasso is likely the photographer.

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