Posts by: John Veldhoen

Anthony Hernandez

 By John Veldhoen

I’ve had some exposure to some issues in translation around a Greek word, and a cognate, for theatre: Theaomai, which is the verb, and root, meaning to look upon, to see, or gaze (a word that deserves recuperation), and theatron, which is the noun, for the building set aside for the activity. It is interesting to me that writers have in the past thought of gazing at a spectacle in terms of dependence, conjuring up that the truth of viewing may be nothing less than the consumption and negation of those same images. I don’t believe this, and think it is far south from being true, and is to do with a desire to falsely pair art and politics.

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Stranger than Fiction

 By John Veldhoen

Teju Cole recently wrote what I thought was the best breakdown on the subject of surrealist photography, and managed against what seems like all odds to prepare a short introduction for The New York Times Magazine while maintaining empathy with the topic. Cole writes with clarity. I like feeling located, right side up, full, and I like fine, lapidary, complete, formal, or natural shapes. Naturalism is good, and I think his writing is chiefly an example of naturalism. 

Photo ByTrevor Hernandez

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Paz Errázuriz

 By John Veldhoen

I am overpowered by the photographs of Paz Errázuriz, and have not found it in the slightest way a simple thing to address this body of work. Her survey monograph from Aperture arrived earlier this year, and I have had a difficulty confronting the spare series “Heart Attack of the Soul” head on, as well as the section “Sleeping”.

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Book Review: The Blind Photographer

 By John Veldhoen

I am so proud that I was able to get behind this book long before I ever saw it. The Camera Store sells books, which is a bit of a marketing challenge, given our name, as you might imagine… When I order books, I read descriptions, and I become acquainted with presses, authors, editors, track records, details, but sometimes what finally comes to the shop is a little less, and sometimes, hopefully, a lot more than I expected. I’ve become familiar with the designer of The Blind Photographer, and Julian Rothenstein’s Redstone Press. I love the vibrant colour of his De-Stijl-y designs, and I have been in love with books, and page design all of my adult life, from David Carson’s wonky illegible type frenzy and Raygun magazine, to the eminent rationality of the statistician Edward Tufte’s work. I love books and magazines that play with form. This book is a little more restrained, but look at the multi-coloured braided headband, this small flourish, this detail calls out, it announces a personal love of the gift of sight, and so touchingly.

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